What to Know About Cuts
 
 

What to Know About Cuts

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What to Know About Cuts

  • A clean cut rarely becomes infected. Hold the cut under cool tap water or rub it clean in a basin of water.

  • For cuts that don't stop bleeding on their own, apply firm pressure on the wound with a sterile gauze dressing for several minutes.

  • Cuts should be covered with an adhesive bandage or butterfly strip.

  • If your cut won't stop bleeding or gapes open, if there is dirt in it that you can't remove, or if it looks infected, call your doctor.

  • If you haven't had a tetanus booster for 10 years, you should get a shot when injured.